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20th January 2014

Exeter celebrates second 700th Anniversary Symposium

Last Saturday, 18th January, alumni, students and friends converged at Exeter College for the College’s second 700th Anniversary Symposium. The event, focusing on the celebration of Exeter’s academic excellence, was conceptualised by Professor Jared Tanner (Tutorial Fellow in Mathematics), and examined a variety of themes on the subjects of Mathematics and the Physical Sciences.

Seven speakers, representing fellows and alumni from the Exeter family, spoke at the symposium. The speakers explored various themes such as the susceptibility of jobs to computerisation, and what exactly we see in the Large Hadron Collider.

Following these lectures, eight of Exeter’s graduate and undergraduate students gave short presentations on their current field of study.

Please click here to download a copy of the programme which includes speaker biographies.

A full list of speakers and their presentations can be found below.

“The Exeter Perspective: Machine Learning”
Dr Michael Osborne (Fellow in Engineering Science) – The Future of Employment: How Susceptible are Jobs to Computerisation?
Sara Adams (2005, Computer Science) – Clark’s Third Law: Any Sufficiently Advanced Technology is Indistinguishable from Magic
“A Wider View: The Impact of Research”
Professor Cornelia Druţu (Fellow & Tutor in Pure Mathematics) – A Horse-Drawn Omnibus: How Poicaré’s Ideas Influenced Modern Mathematics and Computer Science
David Hancock (1998, Physics) – Fusion Power: Clean Energy Within our Grasp?
“The Exeter Perspective: Very Small, Very Fast”
Dr Philipp Kukura (Fellow in Physical Chemistry) – Seeing Smaller and Faster: A High Speed Camera for the Nanoworld
Tom Melia (Doctoral Candidate & Lecturer at Exeter College) – What We Really See at the Large Hadron Collider (and How to Describe it with Maths)
“A Wider View: Exeter’s Graduate Research”
Professor Andrew Steane (Official Fellow) – Quantum Computing: Lessons in Physics and Metaphysics
Student Slides – Eight Exeter Students Explain their Research

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